Prong Live Concert Photo Gallery, Chad Lee Photography

Prong photos, all images ©Chad Lee Photography

 

Prong

2016

8-20-2016 Dallas Texas Gas Monkey Live Ride For Dime 

 

2012

8-18-2012 Somerset Wisconsin Knotfest 

 

4-22-2012 Nashville Tennessee Exit/In 

 

See the band perform Snap Your Fingers Snap Your Neck at Ride For Dime 2016 

official artist Facebook , official band website , official artist YouTube

Tommy Victor plays Schecter Guitars , Art Cruz plays Meinl Cymbals and Trick Drums

Bio (allMusic.com)

 New York’s Prong carved  their own niche with their minimalist urban take on the genre. After years working as a sound man at New York’s CBGB, Tommy Victor(vocals/guitars) drafted doorman Mike Kirkland (bass) and ex-Swans drummer Ted Parsons to form Prong in the mid-’80s. The trio’s early independent releases — Primitive Origins and Force Fed — were extremely raw and betrayed their hardcore roots. By the time the group signed with Epic for 1990’s Beg to Differ, though, Victor and company had transformed into a highly technical thrash metal outfit, shelling out clinical staccato riffs and start-stop rhythms peppered with subtle melodies and occasional bursts of speed. The album’s title track was a minor hit, helping to put the band on the map once it received regular exposure on MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball.

Prong re-formed in 2000, and after releasing a live album, 100% Live, the bandmembers went back into the studio to write their first studio album in six years, 2003’s Scorpio Rising. Signed to Al Jourgensen‘s 13th Planet label, Prongreleased their seventh album, Power of the Damager, in 2007. A remix album, Power of the Damn Mixxxer, followed in 2009 before the band returned three years later with Carved Into Stone. Their ninth album, the thrash-heavy Ruining Lives, appeared in May of 2014. The all-covers album Songs from the Black Hole followed in 2015 and featured songs from influences like Bad Brains (“Banned in D.C.”), Neil Young (“Cortez the Killer”), and Sisters of Mercy (“Vision Thing”). The following year saw the release of their 11th studio long-player, X (No Absolutes).